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Allium tricoccum
WILD LEEK, RAMP, SPRING ONION

SKU: 100-010
Regular price $5.25
Unit price
per

Description

Allium tricoccum (commonly known as ramp, ramps, spring onion, ramson, wild leek, wood leek, and wild garlic) is a North American species of wild onion widespread across eastern Canada and the eastern United States.

Allium tricoccum is a bulb-forming perennial with broad, smooth, light green leaves, often with deep purple or burgundy tints on the lower stems, and a scallion-like stalk and bulb. The flower stalk appears after the leaves have died back, unlike the similar Allium ursinum, in which leaves and flowers can be seen at the same time. Ramps grow in close groups strongly rooted just beneath the surface of the soil.

Since the growth of ramps is not as widespread there as in Appalachia and because of human activity, ramps are a threatened species in Quebec. Allium tricoccum is a protected species under Quebec legislation. A person may have ramps in his or her possession outside the plant's natural environment, or may harvest it for personal use not exceeding 50 bulbs or 50 plants, provided those activities do not take place in a park within the meaning of the National Parks Act.

Ramps are considered a species of "special concern" for conservation in Maine, Rhode Island, and Tennessee. They are also considered "commercially exploited" in Tennessee.

Type: Hardy perennial

Hardiness zones: 4-7

Location: Sun or shade

Germination: Start these seeds right away to preserve viability, no matter the time of year. Sow the seeds just under the surface of a sterile seed-start mix, and water in. Then cover them with plastic and place in a fridge for 5-6 weeks. Be sure they stay moist. After the cold stratification period they are then brought back to room temperature for them to germinate. Germination is generally within 60 days after the warming period, though they could take a few months. If possible, the best location for sowing in March, April and early May, is in a cold frame or cold greenhouse where they will receive the cold period and fluctuating temperatures naturally.

Allium tricoccum
WILD LEEK, RAMP, SPRING ONION

SKU: 100-010
Regular price $5.25
Unit price
per
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Description

Allium tricoccum (commonly known as ramp, ramps, spring onion, ramson, wild leek, wood leek, and wild garlic) is a North American species of wild onion widespread across eastern Canada and the eastern United States.

Allium tricoccum is a bulb-forming perennial with broad, smooth, light green leaves, often with deep purple or burgundy tints on the lower stems, and a scallion-like stalk and bulb. The flower stalk appears after the leaves have died back, unlike the similar Allium ursinum, in which leaves and flowers can be seen at the same time. Ramps grow in close groups strongly rooted just beneath the surface of the soil.

Since the growth of ramps is not as widespread there as in Appalachia and because of human activity, ramps are a threatened species in Quebec. Allium tricoccum is a protected species under Quebec legislation. A person may have ramps in his or her possession outside the plant's natural environment, or may harvest it for personal use not exceeding 50 bulbs or 50 plants, provided those activities do not take place in a park within the meaning of the National Parks Act.

Ramps are considered a species of "special concern" for conservation in Maine, Rhode Island, and Tennessee. They are also considered "commercially exploited" in Tennessee.

Type: Hardy perennial

Hardiness zones: 4-7

Location: Sun or shade

Germination: Start these seeds right away to preserve viability, no matter the time of year. Sow the seeds just under the surface of a sterile seed-start mix, and water in. Then cover them with plastic and place in a fridge for 5-6 weeks. Be sure they stay moist. After the cold stratification period they are then brought back to room temperature for them to germinate. Germination is generally within 60 days after the warming period, though they could take a few months. If possible, the best location for sowing in March, April and early May, is in a cold frame or cold greenhouse where they will receive the cold period and fluctuating temperatures naturally.