PRAIRIE WOOD LILY Lilium philadelphicum

PRAIRIE WOOD LILY Lilium philadelphicum

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The plant is widely distributed in much of Canada from British Columbia to Quebec, and parts of the United States (Northeast and Great Lakes regions plus the Rocky and Appalachian Mountains).

Lilium philadelphicum grows to a height of approximately 30 to 90 centimeters. It produces red or orange blooms between June and August.

Lilium philadelphicum is listed as an endangered species in Maryland, New Mexico, Tennessee and North Carolina. Its status is a threatened species in Kentucky and Ohio.

As the Saskatchewan provincial floral emblem it is protected under the Provincial Emblems and Honours Act, and cannot be picked, uprooted or destroyed in any manner.

Cats are extremely sensitive to lily toxicity, and households and gardens that are visited by cats are advised against keeping this plant.

Type: Hardy perennial and native wildflower

Hardiness zones: 4-8

Height: 30-90cm

Location: Sun or

Bloom time: Summer

Seeds per pack: 5

Note: This plant species is known to have toxicity. Ingestion of these seeds or this plant can cause illness such as vomiting or diarrhea.

Germination: As with many perennials, these seeds can benefit from a period of moist cold to help them grow. This is done by giving them a cold 'winter' period (artificial or natural), and then a warming to simulate 'spring', and time to grow! Here's how this can be done:

Obtain a planting container that has holes in the bottom for excess water to drain. Place the seeds just under the surface of your growing medium, and water. Place your container in a cold area (but not freezing, perhaps a refrigerator) for 5-6 weeks. Once the cold period is completed, place the container at room temperature for them to germinate. Be sure to keep the soil moist during this entire germination period. Seedlings will sprout a few weeks, or occasionally several months, after the warming period.

Alternatively, these seeds can also be planted outdoors in fall, winter, or early spring, while temperatures are still cold (but ground is workable) to germinate naturally in spring. Be sure to mark the area where you planted them, and that the soil is consistently moist.


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